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Areas to know about Paradox of Health Obsession

If they made us feel good, maybe obsessive thoughts might not be so bad. This is more like wishful thinking, though. www.showmestrength.com/paradox-health-obsession/ has some nice tips on this. Obsessive thoughts often appear to cause the thinker increased anxiety and, or depression, in addition to taking up considerable mental space in our lives. And if that’s not bad enough, here’s another truth to seal the deal about obsessive thinking: it’s common knowledge that repeated thinking about a thing can start to make the thing, being thought of, appear in one’s life over a period of time, but generally not in the way one would anticipate.Knowing this, one begins to get a true image of how much control obsessive thoughts exert over the life of a person, because obsessive thoughts are actually nothing more than focused mental attention. And the secret to every great success storey in life is concentrated mental concentration. Unfortunately, in the case of obsessive thoughts, mental attention is focused on something that the thinking does not appear to gain. Rather, it’s a way to dump all the strength of one’s thinking down the drain.

Any real obsessive thinker has at least some understanding that the malaise of their thought process puts their lives on hold effectively, stagnating their capacity to act solely on their own behalf. But there can be a long road between realising this and learning how to reverse the habit of repetitive thinking: cognitive behavioural interventions, strategies, instruments, medicines … All providing from no relief to absolute relief for some everywhere.There’s another solution I’m about to propose, but hear me out on this. This one is unknown to the mainstream and came to my attention only because I believe I have almost, if not all, exhausted the solutions provided by the multitudes of conventional wisdom claiming expertise in this problem. The approach I’m going to explain is to train the brain using binaural beats, but to practise the mind and brain a little first.