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Dental Implants Hoppers Crossing- Insights

Today we know that there are many different factors involved in the success of dental implants and osseointegration, in general. Some of the most important factors are:
– The biocompatibility of the implant material – Titanium is a good material not so much because the body likes it, but because the body does not reject it. It does not tend to corrode like stainless steel. Biocompatibility is both a short-term and long-term consideration. Research on other biocompatible materials continues. Dental Implants Hoppers Crossing has some nice tips on this.

 

– The design or shape of the implant – Dr. Alvin Strock in 1937, working in a Harvard University lab, came up with the idea of using a screw-shaped implant, which is one of the most successful design shapes and most commonly used today. Additional design research continues.

– The surface of the implant – This continues to be one of the most highly-researched areas to determine what coatings should be used as well as how porous they should be to result in the best osseointegration and long-term result.

– The condition of the receiving bone tissue – Good bone health and good oral health in general have long been recognized as crucial factors for successful dental implants. For this reason, bone grafts and restorations often precede the implant process when the host tissue is not in good condition.

– The implant surgical method – How and when the bone and surrounding tissue is surgically prepared to receive the implant is very important. Excessive damage and disturbance of the bone tissue can diminish success rates. The topic of how many stages of preparation are required in order to achieve the greatest success is also the subject of recent research, concurrent with the emergence of one-step implant products/processes.

– The load on the implant – Research also continues on the influence of load (force) on the implant. The direction of the load is important, and will vary according to the position in the mouth. Detrimental load usually results in bone loss and eventual loss of stability of the dental implant. All aspects of load – including whether it can/should be immediate, intermediate, or delayed for certain conditions – are still being explored in greater detail for their influence on successful outcomes.

Contact Info

Sayers Dental Aesthetics & Implants
1/483 Sayers Rd, Hoppers Crossing, VIC 3029
Phone No. :  (03) 9749 1178